Showing 20 results

Authority record
Region 1 Archives of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

United Lutheran Church in America

  • ELCA 1.3
  • Corporate body
  • 1918-1962

In 1918, three German-language Synods (General Council of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in North America, the General Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in the USA, and the United Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in the South) merged to form the United Lutheran Church in America. These groups had worked together for some time prior to the merger, issuing a Common Service in 1888, forming a Home Mission Arbitration Commission in 1907, and removing doctrinal differences by constitutional amendment in 1911. The Evangelical Lutheran Zion Synod joined the ULCA in 1920, followed by the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North America in 1942. In 1962, the ULCA became part of the newly formed Lutheran Church in America.

The Pacific Synod of the United Lutheran Church in American included Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Alaska, and British Columbia.

Trinity Lutheran College

  • ELCA 7.2.7
  • Corporate body
  • 1944-2016

Trinity Lutheran College began in 1944 as the Lutheran Bible Institute of Seattle (LBIS). Based in Minneapolis, the Lutheran Bible Institute system established campuses in Seattle, WA (1944), Teaneck, New Jersey (1948), and Los Angeles, CA (1951). All three campuses eventually became independent. LBIS began operations out of Gethsemane Lutheran Church in downtown Seattle. In 1949, the Institute relocated to a campus on Greenwood Avenue in North Seattle. LBIS initially focused on one and two year education programs in biblical studies and youth ministry. Over time, educational offerings expanded and enrollment grew, necessitating another move in 1979. The Institute purchased land in Issaquah, WA, that had previously been the home of Providence Heights College, from the Sisters of Providence. In 1982, LBIS became accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities and expanded their offerings to include bachelors programs in traditional liberal arts areas such as education, communication, and music. To reflect the Institute's broad offerings and accredited status, the name was changed to Trinity Lutheran College in 1999. The College moved again in 2008, this time to the Port Gardner Building in downtown Everett, WA. Program offerings included 10 majors and 17 minors for Bachelors students, along with Certificate and Associate programs. That same year, the Trinity Education Foundation was established to provide financial support for Trinity students. In 2016, the College announced that they would cease operations. The final class graduated in May of that year. The Trinity Education Foundation continues to operate, now providing scholarship operations for students pursuing educational opportunities at faith-based institutions.

Trinity Lutheran Church (Tacoma, Washington)

  • ELCA 7.2.32
  • Corporate body
  • 1919-present

The congregation was officially organized on August 25, 1919. In cooperation with Pacific Lutheran University, members of the congregation erected a church on the college campus in 1920, and worship was held there until 1936 when the congregation purchased the property of the Parkland Evangelical Lutheran Church. The structure (built in 1902) was razed, and the present sanctuary was built and dedicated on June 8, 1958. Trinity has helped to establish several churches in the area, including Christ the King in Midland, Christ Lutheran in Lakewood, Spanaway Lutheran, and Gethsemane Lutheran at South 76th.

Suomi Synod

  • ELCA 1.7
  • Corporate body
  • 1890-1963

The Suomi Synod was formed by Finnish Lutherans in Calumet, Michigan in March of 1890. In 1896, the Synod founded the Suomi College in Theological Seminary in Hancock, Michigan. The Synod closely aligned with the doctrine of the State Church of Finland. Beginning in 1920, the Suomi Synod began a partnership with the ULCA to form an Immigrant Mission Board which helped support the work of the Finnish Missionary Society. The Suomi Synod was part of the 1963 merger to form the LCA.

Peace Lutheran Church (Rainier, Oregon)

  • ELCA 6.2.9
  • Corporate body
  • 1954-1969

Peace Lutheran Church was assembled first as a Lutheran Mission in Rainier, Oregon in 1954. The mission was initially named Rainier First Lutheran and was led first by Pastor Leroy E. Pillman and, beginning in 1957, Pastor James H. Goss. The congregation officially organized in 1958 under the name Peace Lutheran. Peace Lutheran had several visiting pastors until 1962 when they called Pastor Wilton H. Anderson, who they shared with Brownsmead congregation. In 1969, the church was disbanded due to low membership.

Norwegian Synod

  • ELCA 1.5
  • Corporate body
  • 1853-1958

The Norwegian Synod was formed by Norwegian Lutheran dedicated to theological orthodoxy and preserving the traditions and teachings of the Church of Norway. The synod was organized in 1953 by clergyman JWC Dietrichson. In 1857, the Synod decided to establish Luther College in Decorah, Iowa, which opened in 1861. In 1876, a seminary was established in Madison, Wisconsin. In 1917, the Norwegian Synod merged with the Hauge Synod and the United Church to form the Norwegian Lutheran Church in America. Thirteen out of 351 synod pastors objected to the merger. Those pastors formed the Norwegian Synod of the American Evangelical Lutheran Church. The first president of this new synod was Bjug Harstad. In 1958, as more congregations moved away from Norwegian language and traditions, the Norwegian Lutheran Church in America became the Evangelical Lutheran Synod.

Martin Luther Lutheran Church (Portland, Oregon)

  • ELCA 6.2.8
  • Corporate body
  • 1956-1975

Martin Luther Lutheran Church was organized in 1956 in Portland, Oregon. They started construction on their church building in 1957. The church was built largely with the help of volunteer work and donations. Martin Luther Lutheran Church was officially dissolved in 1975.

Lutheran Church in America

  • ELCA 1.10
  • Corporate body
  • 1962-1987

The Lutheran Church in America was formed at a 1962 meeting in Detroit, Michigan as the result of a merger of the AELC, the Augustana Evangelical Lutheran Church, and the Suomi Synod. Discussions about a possible merger had begun in 1955. The LCA was organized into 33 synods. In 1987, it merged with the Association of Lutheran Churches and the American Lutheran Church to form the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

Holy Sacrament Lutheran Church (Portland, Oregon)

  • ELCA 6.2.7
  • Corporate body
  • 1953-1987

The Holy Sacrament Lutheran Church congregation of Portland, Oregon first organized in a home on September 1, 1952 under the name Green Gables Lutheran Church. The first service was held on October 5 of that year under the direction of the Home Mission program of the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod. The congregation was formally organized on January 24, 1953 and took the name Holy Sacrament Lutheran Church. Property was obtained and church building erected. The congregation sold half of its acreage to Portland Unity Church, and the decision was made to pay off the Northwest District's Church extension loan. Holy Sacrament then entered into the American Evangelical Lutheran Church. Beginning in the 1960s, the congregation shared the sanctuary space with Hope Lutheran Church for the Deaf, the Seventh Day Baptist Church, and a non-denominational group called Calvary Chapel.

Holden Village

  • ELCA 6.4.1
  • Corporate body
  • 1957-present

In 1896, James Henry Holden made his first claim on the area which would later become Holden Village. However, due to the expense and difficulty involved in transporting copper from the isolated mine, the operation did not begin its full productivity until 1937. By 1938 the mine had become successful and processed 2,000 pounds of copper ore daily.

The Howe Sound Company built a town site on the north side of Railroad Creek soon after the mine began to thrive. The town site consisted of a number of dormitories, a gymnasium, bowling alley, mess hall, school, and hospital, among other things. West of the town site was a patch of small houses intended for miners and their families. The Holden Mine and its town site flourished for many years despite the isolation. However, after World War II the price of metal fell and the resources of the mine began to diminish. The mine was closed in 1957.

With the closing of the mine in 1957, the Howe Sound Company sought a buyer for the Holden Mine and town site. With an asking price of $100,000, the remote piece of property did not sell. However, Wes Prieb, a man active in the Lutheran Bible Institute of Seattle, saw the potential for a spiritual retreat center at the old mine. Originally he asked the Howe Sound Company to give the land to the Lutheran Church as a gift. The Company refused, but eventually agreed to sell the mine, town site, and all the land for one dollar.

With the purchase of the land came a multitude of problems for the Lutheran Bible Institute. The structures were old and decrepit. Many were on the brink of collapse and those that still stood did not meet current building codes. With the help of large brigades of volunteers, the Lutheran Bible Institute successfully cleaned and refurbished many of the buildings. The Village began to function as a summer retreat center soon afterward. Originally, the Lutheran Bible Institute imagined a summer-only center, and kept limited staff on-hand for the first few winters. However, both the infrastructure needs of the community and the natural beauty of Holden Village in the winter led to the creation of a year-round retreat center.

Today, Holden Village operates as a year-round retreat center and is one of the most remote continuously inhabited places in the contiguous United States. Largely run by volunteers, the Village offers educational programming and outdoor recreation opportunities to visitors from all over the world.

Results 1 to 10 of 20